Reindeer husbandry as a resource for the society: Present contribution and future possibilities

Seminarium

Reindeer husbandry as a resource for the society: Present contribution and future possibilities Klicka för mer information

Reindeer husbandry as a resource for the society: Present contribution and future possibilities

Although the life of reindeer herding families has always been demanding, the indigenous reindeer herding peoples throughout the circumpolar North today face major challenges. Climate change, altered societal circumstances, and loss of vital grazing lands (due to oil and gas production, hydro electric dams, infrastructure, wind power and forestry) are examples of phenomena that threaten reindeer husbandry practices and cultures. Competition for resources increases and as a consequence, internal and external conflicts become more common.

Thus, challenges and problems, conflicts and controversies, are often in focus in the discussion about reindeer husbandry. All too often the merits of reindeer husbandry are forgotten or neglected. All too often we tend to forget that reindeer husbandry in a multitude of ways makes considerable contributions to the society.

The fact is that reindeer husbandry since time immemorial has been of great economic and cultural importance for many indigenous peoples in the Barents Euro-Arctic Region. It is also one of the most resilient forms of livelihood in the region. Reindeer husbandry represents an important model of sustainable exploitation and management of northern terrestrial ecosystems based on experience accumulated over generations, conserved, developed and adapted to the climatic, political and economic systems of the north.

Under the auspices of the Swedish Presidency of the Arctic Council and the Swedish Presidency of the Arctic Council’s Sustainable Development Working Group (SDWG), the Royal Swedish Academy of Agriculture and Forestry and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences invites to the seminar: Reindeer husbandry as a resource for the society – Present contribution and future possibilities. Research, on-going activities, success stories, and reindeer husbandry as a model for resource management and local food production will be presented and discussed under four main topics: Landscape and biodiversity; Food; Traditional knowledge (including art, handicraft, etc); and Local (rural) socio-economics.

December 3, 2012

Moderator   Anders Esselin, Man & Nature

12.30 Registration
13.00 Practicalities
Moderator Anders Esselin, Man & Nature
13.05 Welcome/Introduction
Gustaf Lind, Ambassador, Swedish Chair of Artic Council’s Senior Artic Officials
13.30 Reindeer husbandry’s contribution to the resilience of forest and tundra landscapes
Jon Moen, Professor, Umeå University
14.00 Reindeer husbandry’s effects on biodiversity
Kari Anne Bråhten, Researcher, University of Tromsø
14.30 Increased productivity by caring for the animal
Birgitta Åhman, Professor, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU
15.00 Sami food (including coffee and sami snacks)
Greta Huuva, Sami Food Ambassador
16.00 High quality meat based on natural ecosystems
Birgitta Åhman, Professor, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU
16.15 Traditional knowledge – a holistic approach to sustainability?
Håkan Tunón, Senior Research Officer at Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
16.45 Reindeer herding’s role for carrying culture, language and the livelihood
in sami villages
Liisa Holmberg, Director of the Sami educational centre in Inari
17.15 Discussion
Panel with Sami youth representatives Risten Marja Inga, Noereh, and Tuomas Aslak Juuso, Suoma Sámi Nuorat
17.45 End of day
19.00 Dinner at Loftet, SLU

December 4, 2012

 Moderator   Anders Esselin, Man & Nature

09.00 Welcome back
Moderator Anders Esselin
09.05 Reindeer husbandry’s contribution to rural socio-economics
Jan-Åge Riseth, Researcher at Northern Research Institute, Tromsø, Norway
09.35 Reindeer husbandry’s contribution in the municipality of Jokkmokk
Ingrid Inga, Swedish Sami Parliament and Jokkmokk municipality
10.00 Economic and social effects of sami tourism
Dieter Müller, Professor Umeå University
10.30 Coffee
11.00 Reindeer husbandry as a prerequisite for tourism
Dan Jonasson, Project Coordinator Visit Sápmi
11.30 Discussion
Panel with Sami youth representatives Risten Marja Inga, Noereh, and Tuomas Aslak Juuso, Suoma Sámi Nuorat
11.55 Concluding remarks

 Program may be subject to change